3 Knots That Will Impress Your Valentine


by Nick Bradley January 25, 2017

The Eldredge Knot

The Eldridge is a unorthodox, complex & eye-catching necktie knot that involves 15 separate steps. It was invented by Jeffrey Eldredge in 2007 and achieved internet fame in 2008. As opposed to the vast majority of tie knots, the Eldredge knot is produced by using the small end as the active end. When completed, the remaining small end is hidden behind the shirt collar. The knot is large (larger than the Windsor) and creates a tapered fishtail braid-like effect. Not for the faint of heart, this knot must be worn with caution.

The Eldredge Knot Tying Instructions

The Trinity Knot

The Trinity knot, much like the Eldredge knot, is a relatively recent innovation. The finished knot shares a resemblance with the Celtic Triquetra knot. Tied using the small end as the active end, this knot is initially tied loosely and pulled tight at the very end. The Trinity produces a rounded shape that is slightly asymmetrical, slightly larger than the Windsor knot and is visually striking. All who gaze upon the trinity knot will worship her.

The Trinity Knot Tying Instructions

The Van Wijk Knot

The incredibly tall and cylindrical Van Wijk knot was invented by artist Lisa van Wijk in an attempt to create the tallest wearable knot possible. The Van Wijk is an augmentation of the Prince Albert, adding a third turning of the active end. When tied correctly, this long and slender knot creates a striking and unmistakable helical effect.

The Van Wijk Knot Tying Instructions

Be sure to let us know which knot your Valentine liked the best.
And use the code "KNOT" for 20% off!




Nick Bradley
Nick Bradley

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